A Question of Music? A Retelling!

A friend recently asked me why music was such an integral part of my characters. Not so much in Through the Fire but most certainly with the first two books in the O’Connor Sisters Trilogy. My friend pointed out I don’t listen to music, yet both Cat Conners and Esperanza O’Connor were famous award-winning singers.

As a deaf woman, music is not a part of my life. My sounds come from what my eyes experience around me. Take me to the museum. Let me stand before a Monet, Rembrandt, Pollack or even Yayoi Kusama, and I see the music in their work.

I wasn’t born deaf, however. It was a process that took almost forty years. I knew it was happening and I readied myself. I learned the language. I leaned the culture. I immersed myself in both.

I understood one day I would not hear the music on the radio or television or in the concert halls.

I did grieve, yet that was many, many years ago.

However, I remember.

I remember the musical, CATS. I remember Johnny Mathis and Ella Fitzgerald. Bette Midler was always playing in my car and house. Chaka Kahn (we are birthday twins,) I remember the power of her voice. She was the last person I saw in concert before the last of my hearing went. Her old repertoire, the music I grew up with, I heard as if I were listening to my old LPs. Her new songs, I had no idea what was going on; there was no memory of it.

So to have the O’Connor twins both accomplished musical artist is not a stretch for me.

I don’t hear their music. Cat Conners sings The Man That Got Away immortalized by the great Judy Garland. Nor Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue as played on the Steinway Grand Piano by Esperanza O’Conner.

But…I…Remember.

And remembering is enough.

Remembering makes a Pollack sound as if an experimental Jazz Ensemble were splashed on the canvas. It makes a Monet sound like the music outside a Parisian Café. Finally, Yayoi Kusama’s “Infinity Mirrored Room – Aftermath of Obliteration of Eternity,” which I recently saw at the Seattle Art Museum, was a chorus of angels weeping songs for the lost souls of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. It broke my heart!

I Remember!

And remembering is enough.

Thank you for your time and as always…”Keep Reading!”

Raj Lowenstein

www.rajlowenstein.net

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Another Review to share from MidwestBookReview.com

Through the Fire
Raj Lowenstein
Trafford Publishing
1663 Liberty Drive, Bloomington, IN 47403
http://www.trafford.com
9781490768403, $31.99, HC, 290pp, http://www.amazon.com

Synopsis: Detective Daniel Hartman lives in a three-story condo in the Montrose section of Houston that he rents from his twin brother, Dr. David Hartman. When Daniel wakes up to discover a woman, Michael Braun, naked and recovering from a savage attack, his first instincts are those of a detective. The woman is not a stranger, however. His life will change as the woman becomes entwined not only with his life but also with his heart. Michael is scared, homeless, and unsure of what is happening. Detective Hartman is an intimately familiar stranger, who, without hesitation, wraps her in his protective arms and steals her heart. Can she be sure that this vicious attack was a random act when she remembers nothing of the episode itself? Has Michael’s past, a past she struggled to escape from, found her? Can she keep herself and the man she loves safe without losing more than her soul? Will Detective Hartman become a pawn in a killer’s twisted game of revenge? Will he become his lover’s dagger, or will he go through the fire to save what he has found?

Critique: A simply riveting read from cover to cover, “Through the Fire” reveals author Raj Lowenstein’s genuine flair for originality and a storytelling style replete with unexpected twists and turns. While very highly recommended for community library Romantic Thriller & Mystery/Suspense collections, it should be noted for personal reading lists that “Through the Fire” is also available in a paperback edition (9781490768380, $20.99) and in a digital book format (Kindle, $3.99).

 

Keep reading!

Raj Lowenstein

http://www.rajlowenstein.net